Crumbling Pillars

Fixing the economy starts with voters

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The crucial pillars on which the country should function are showing major cracks and are on the edge of crumbling. In the process, the critical infrastructure is demolished piece by piece.

One aspect should enjoy the highest priority to solve the severe problems of our country, and that is economic growth. Moreover, for economic growth to flourish, it is crucial to create a healthy environment for investors to invest in South Africa.

Apart from that, South Africa should be a safe environment for its residents. It is worrying when a country has a murder rate of more than 50 people per day, but politicians keep quiet, thus not honouring their primary responsibility of looking after the safety of its residents.

Analysing these pillars leads to several serious questions concerning all of them. Look at infrastructure, security services, health care and social services with more than 17 million people dependent on social grants, but only 7 million paying taxes. It could be less strenuous to name only the pillars standing strong and adding to healthy economic growth. Undoubtedly the list will be much shorter.

Of course, people want to be positive and constructively build on the future of our country and its residents. However, to achieve this, there should be an environment where everyone can make a contribution and where investments would be safe.

When a country sends a message to the world announcing it will amend the constitution to expropriate its residents’ belongings without paying for it, it can just as well be called nationalisation or legal theft. Which person in their right mind will consider investing in that country?

This is probably the most serious aspect endangering the future of the country.

The attack on the assets of the country is a desperate effort of the ruling party to try and convince the voting masses that riches will grace them soon.

With a population of more than 60 million people and a surface of around 122 million hectares, the government’s promise of land for everyone will result in roughly 2 hectares for each person. Where will the food come from when everyone has their own little piece of land?

The government has a track record of an admitted failure rate of 90% for redistributed land. More than 67% of the population has urbanised.

How empty must the shelves be and how expensive must food become before the government realises the country’s biggest asset is its productive commercial farmers?

The attack on land and assets is the last straw the desperate ruling party is clutching. It is based on lies about the history of how land-ownership evolved over the years.

TLU SA has some time ago offered a reward of R100 000 to any person who can prove a TLU SA member stole their land. The kitty is still safe. The history of land ownership should be tested in the future by independent historians, and should preferably be done under the guidance of a lawful process in the international area.

The uncertainty around policy paired with the unacceptable safety situation is forcing people who can afford it out of the country. These are the people with the skills, investment potential and entrepreneurial spirit. How do you want to fix the knowledge base without them?

Can South Africa be cured of the environment where the country is looted, corruption is the norm, and life means nothing?

There is only one place to start fixing this situation, and that’s with voters. The governing party guides the country’s political will, and voters give them their mandate. If we prefer to not build a future for our descendants, it is correct to keep up with the current voting pattern.

However, somewhere the voting public will start realising the empty promises of the government are not executable. We can only hope this happens before the food shelves are empty, and our inflation rate surpasses that of Zimbabwe. 

Bennie van Zyl, General Manager, TAU

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